Sweet Ginger Lemon Drop Martini

On grey winter days that aren’t chilly enough to bring snow but aren’t warm enough to enjoy being outside, I find myself looking for sunshine any place I can find it. I believe this is what has lead to the recent run on trying out new lemon martini concoctions. A dash of bright sunshine in a sugar rimmed martini glass helps to bring out warm, rosie cheeks and a smile.

The Sweet Ginger Lemon Drop is a twist on the classic and the secret ingredient is Crater Lake’s Sweet Ginger Vodka produced by our local Bend Distillery. If you haven’t tried this yet, you’re missing out. It adds a flavor layer that compliments the simple Lemon Drop boosting it to a new level of sophistication.

The original recipe is courtesy of CraterLakeSpirits.com

Sweet Ginger Lemon Drop Martini
Sweet Ginger Lemon Drop Martini

Sweet Ginger Lemon Drop Martini Recipe

Fresh Lemons

Sugar

Crater Lake Sweet Ginger Vodka

Ice

Dissolve equal amounts of table sugar into heated water to make simple syrup. I make enough to last several days with 1 cup of sugar and 1 cup of water. Extra can be kept covered in the refrigerator for a few days. Sugar must be completely dissolved or liquid will be grainy. Refrigerate until cool.

Chill martini glass in freezer. Save a wedge of the lemon for garnish, then squeeze remaining lemons to make 2 oz of juice – one medium ripe lemon should do it. Rim chilled martini glass with lemon wedge and then dip in granulated sugar to creat sugared rim.

Fill cocktail shaker with 1-2 cups of ice, add the 2oz fresh lemon juice to shaker with 2 oz of Sweet Ginger Vodka and 1.5 oz of simple syrup sugar mix. Shake until outside of shaker begins to frost then strain into prepared martini glass.

Garnish with lemon wedge and enjoy!

Do you have a variation of the classic lemon drop martini that is note worthy?  Leave me a message, I’d love to give it a try!

Sweet Ginger Lemon Drop Martini
Sweet Ginger Lemon Drop Martini

Lemon Dream Martini

If you wish you could wrap your fingers around a lemon dreamsicle, this is a martini for you! It’s not quite as tart as a lemon drop, not as sweet as limoncello and the cream is the perfect addition.

Lemon Dream Martini

Lemon Dream Martini 

1.5 ounces Lemon Vodka

1.5 ounces Limoncello

3 ounces of half and half or cream

1-2 teaspoons of frozen lemonade concentrate

Lemon Drop rimming sugar or crushed lemon drop candies

Fresh Sliced Lemons

Ice

Slice lemons and use one to rim top of martini glass, then dip in lemon drop rimming sugar. Place in freezer. In cocktail shaker, add generous amount of ice. I fill mine 1/2 to 3/4 of the way with fresh ice. Add 1-2 heaping spoons of frozen lemonade concentrate, limoncello, vodka and cream. Cover. Shake until frost begins to form on outside of shaker. Pour into chilled glass. Garnish with a fresh lemon slice. I like to give mine a squeeze before floating the lemon on top.  Enjoy!

If you want this more tart, squeeze in more lemon juice. Control the sweetness by adding or subtracting lemonade concentrate or limoncello. Want a stronger cocktail? Cut back on cream or half and half.  Need a lighter version?  Use 2% or whole milk instead of cream.

Lemon Dream Martini

I’d love to hear what you think of this cocktail! I’m also completely open to better name suggestions, drop me a comment!

Disabilities: Removing the Dis and Focusing on Abilities

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My six year old nephew called me last summer. He had been looking through photos of his brother and cousin up at the mountain, noticed he wasn’t in the pictures and had something to say about that.

“Auntie A! Meeeeeeeee skiiiiiiii!!!”

I was cautiously optimistic to hear his request. We’d had him up on skis when he was 4 but he was more interested in eating snow than staying upright. When he was 5, we repeated our trip but when given the option, he chose a sled over skis. Maybe this would be the magical year!

Grant on skis, age 4
At age 4, he was more interested in eating snow than skiing

We’ve been practicing over the past few winters on plastic, slip-on skis to help him get use to the idea of staying upright with his feet strapped onto long boards. At times our quest felt futile. Without real edges or any surface for traction, the plastic skis slipped out from underneath him on the snow. His usually patient and easy going demeanor would give in to frustration. We’d put the skis away until the next time and repeat.

We Carry Our Own Equipment
Even at age 5, we carry our own skis

My nephew has Down Syndrome and that extra chromosome doesn’t do him any favors when it comes to learning a new sport. Muscle flaccidity, decreased motor skill, difficulty with coordination, challenges with verbal skills; it all comes with Trisomy 21. One specialist likened it to trying to function with your body in a sock. Simple things are difficult, like moving the tongue, holding a crayon, picking up a toothpick, using words, turning verbal instructions into actions.

We do all of those things anyway. We focus on our cans, not our can’ts. We use patience and repetition. We laugh a lot. We celebrate advances. We don’t get hung up on imperfection. We move forward, we move backwards, we try again, we don’t give up. This applies to every child, regardless of chromosome count. Some things are hard. We do them anyway.

He’s just six years old, he has an extra chromosome and New Year’s Eve, he made it up the chairlift and down his first run on skis, using his own strength and coordination to control his speed and stop.

And THAT is how we take the dis out of disability!

Focus on Abilities
Thumbs up! He’s officially a skier!